cannabisnews.com: Bill Bans Mix of Kids, Drugs 





Bill Bans Mix of Kids, Drugs 
Posted by FoM on March 04, 2000 at 09:50:19 PT
By Dan Joling, The Associated Press 
Source: Anchorage Daily News
A bill making it a crime to bring children anywhere illegal drugs are being used was approved by the state House on Friday. Adults who bring children into "the immediate physical presence" of the use, delivery or manufacture of drugs could be prosecuted as contributing to the delinquency of a minor, which falls under the most serious classification of misdemeanors. 
Rep. John Cowdery, R-Anchorage, said the bill sends a strong message that the penalties for mixing children and drugs are getting stiffer. But critics said the measure is too broad and that innocent people could be prosecuted if they unwittingly bring children into a public restroom where drugs are being sold or take children on visits to relatives or neighbors who use drugs. Rep. John Davies, D-Fairbanks, said education instead of more laws is needed to address the nation's drug problem, and he quoted a cartoon caption to comment on the ineffectiveness of stiff penalties of current laws. "We're losing the war on drugs, but look at all the prisoners we're taking," Davies said. The original version of House Bill 180 made it a crime to allow children in the presence of anyone possessing drugs - even if the children were not aware of the drugs. Davies said it would be hard to argue that children would be harmed if they did not know drugs were in the room. Democrats continued to argue against the bill after it was amended. Rep. Sharon Cissna, D-Anchorage, said a mother could be prosecuted under the law if she chose for religious reasons to stay with an abusive husband who used drugs. Rep. Ben Grussendorf, R-Sitka, said many people are in different socioeconomic circumstances than legislators and live close to undesirable neighbors or extended family members who use drugs. Parents in such circumstances easily could be with their children in close proximity to drug use and subject to prosecution. Rep. Con Bunde, R-Anchorage, said police and prosecutors would have discretion to withhold charges if a parent were in such circumstances. Rep. Jeannette James, R-North Pole, said allowing children to witness drug use does more harm than possibly encouraging them to try drugs. "It teaches them a total disrespect for the law," James said. The bill was approved 25-11 and now moves to the Senate for consideration. Juneau:Published: Saturday, March 4, 2000 Copyright  2000 The Anchorage Daily News CannabisNews Search of News Articles from Alaska:http://www.alltheweb.com/cgi-bin/asearch?type=all&query=cannabisnews+alaska
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Comment #1 posted by kaptinemo on March 04, 2000 at 15:17:20 PT
That reminds me  :)
Rep. John Davies, D-Fairbanks, said education instead of more laws is needed to address the nation's drug problem, and he quoted a cartoon caption to comment on the ineffectiveness of stiff penalties of current laws. "We're losing the war on drugs, but look at all the prisoners we're taking," Davies said. I heard a British fellow crack a joke once: Russia and China go to war. On the first day, the Russians take 100,000 prisoners. On the second day, the Russians take 1,000,000 prisoners. On the third day, the Russians take 10,000,000 prisoners. On the fourth day, the Russians surrender. The analogy is obvious. This is a 'war' that cannot be won by attrition, no matter what Barry and his bean-counting, chart-scribbling, flag-waving cohorts might think. But back to the matter at hand:'The original version of House Bill 180 made it a crime to allow children in the presence of anyone possessing drugs - even if the children were not aware of the drugs. Davies said it would be hard to argue that children would be harmed if they did not know drugs were in the room.'Let's see: if you are standing in front of a child while holding a can of beer, then you're guilty under this law. What? You say that's preposterous? Why is it? You say it's because alcohol's not a ....uh. Uh. Uh. (sound of mental gears jamming) We have to make them say it. A D-R-U-G. Because once he admits it to himself, a very large and important leg propping up Joe Sixpack's tepid but automatic support of the WoSD will come crashing down. Once that very convenient cognitive dissonance that the DrugWarriors depend upon so much for their support is weakened, then calls for reform will be taken more seriously. Until then, we will continue to have hysterical rubbish like this bill showing up in our legislatures. 
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