cannabisnews.com: CO Seeks Permission for State Colleges to Grow MJ
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CO Seeks Permission for State Colleges to Grow MJ
Posted by CN Staff on January 02, 2015 at 07:13:06 PT
By John Ingold, The Denver Post
Source: Denver Post
Denver -- Colorado has made an unusual plea to federal authorities: Let our colleges grow pot.In a letter sent last month, the state attorney general's office asks federal health and education officials for permission for Colorado's colleges and universities to "obtain marijuana from non-federal government sources" for research purposes.
The letter isn't more specific on how the state's higher-education institutions might score weed. But it was sent pursuant to a law passed in 2014 requiring state officials to ask that Colorado colleges and universities be allowed "to cultivate marijuana and its component parts.""Current research is riddled with bias or insufficiencies and often conflict with one another," reads the letter, written by deputy attorney general David Blake. "It is critical that we be allowed to fill the void of scientific research, and this may only be done with your assistance and cooperation."The request is a longshot.While marijuana is, with qualifications, legal in Colorado, it remains illegal under federal law, and getting permission to conduct research on cannabis requires clearing a set of high hurdles  approval from multiple federal agencies and strict requirements on how marijuana must be handled and stored. Researchers that work without the federal government's blessing risk losing crucial federal funding for their institutions, not to mention possible imprisonment.An international treaty that the United States signed onto requires the federal government to designate only one place in the country that can legally grow marijuana for research. Since 1968, that place has been the University of Mississippi's National Center for Natural Products Research, which cultivates cannabis on a 12-acre plot and sends it to approved researchers.SnippedComplete Article: http://drugsense.org/url/lf2zAY6kNewshawk: AfterburnerSource: Denver Post (CO)Author: John Ingold, The Denver PostPublished: January 2, 2015Copyright: 2015 The Denver Post Website: http://www.denverpost.com/Contact: openforum denverpost.comCannabisNews   -- Cannabis  Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/cannabis.shtml 
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Comment #2 posted by afterburner on January 02, 2015 at 18:31:07 PT
Excuses, Excuses!
"An international treaty that the United States signed onto requires the federal government to designate only one place in the country that can legally grow marijuana for research."It should say, "An international treaty that the United States wrote and pressured other countries to sign onto 
requires the federal government to designate only one place in the country that can legally grow marijuana for research."So, this is why the DEA refused to let Professor Craker grow medical grade cannabis in Massachusetts. 
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Comment #1 posted by observer on January 02, 2015 at 12:43:53 PT
Rump Prohibitionists' Rear Guard
Ah, prohibitionists holding out till the last. Professional prohibitionists, gaming the system in every way possible 'till the bitter end. Playing that corrupt government system for all it is worth: using every regulation, procedural roadblock, illegal domestic dragnet content wiretapping, real-time audio keyword analysis, extra-legal "parallel construction" (i.e. secret police spying on you, then government lying in court to frame you for pot), death squads, gaming the tax system. Gaming the prison system. Same old. 
http://drugnewsbot.org
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