Texas Lawmaker Proposes Lower Marijuana Penalties
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Texas Lawmaker Proposes Lower Marijuana Penalties
Posted by CN Staff on December 15, 2014 at 18:30:02 PT
By Katy Steinmetz
Source: Time 
Texas -- On Monday, Texas State Rep. Joe Moody introduced a bill that would remove criminal penalties for the possession of small amounts of marijuana. “Our current marijuana policy in Texas just isn’t working,” Moody said in a statement. “We need a new approach that allows us to more effectively utilize our limited criminal justice resources. This legislation is a much-needed step in the right direction.”Under current Texas law, possessing up to two oz. of weed can yield six months of jail time and a $2,000 penalty. Under the proposal, adults caught with up to one oz. would get a $100 ticket, similar to a parking violation. Larger amounts would still lead to criminal penalties. The measure would make Texas the 20th state plus the District of Columbia to remove the threat of jail time for the possession of small amounts of weed.
The bill is backed by the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), the pro-legalization group that spearheaded the passage of Colorado’s historic legalization measure. The bill is also the first in a series that the MPP expects to be introduced in Texas this year, the next attempting to legalize medical marijuana and the third attempting to legalize recreational marijuana.The latter two are long shots, and the first won’t be an easy sell to the Republican-controlled legislature. Texas Governor Rick Perry has said he opposes legalization. He has intimated that he supports decriminalizing weed, but has also said that the state has “kind of done that.” In 2007, Texas passed a measure giving local governments the power to respond to marijuana possession with a summons rather than an arrest, but few counties have adopted it and someone issued a summons may still end up in jail.Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, another pro-legalization group, says that Texas is in a tier of states that are the least likely to ease marijuana restrictions. These “third tier” states, he says, are ones in which “the legislature has never shown any want to move in this direction and/or there is an executive at the top who is going to oppose and veto any reforms.”A poll commissioned by MPP in 2013 found that 61% of Texas residents would support a penalty reduction like the one Moody is proposing, while 58% would support the legalization of medical and recreational weed.At a press conference on Monday, Moody was joined by representatives from other groups who support the bill, such as the ACLU of Texas and Republicans Against Marijuana Prohibition. Support from such libertarian-leaning conservatives will be crucial in the heavily Republican state.“Texas doesn’t seem to be ready for a full legal market,” acknowledges Heather Fazio, a representative for MPP in Texas. “That doesn’t mean that the conversation shouldn’t be happening.”Source: Time Magazine (US)Author: Katy SteinmetzPublished: December 15, 2014Copyright: 2014 Time Inc.Contact: letters time.comWebsite:   -- Cannabis Archives 
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Comment #2 posted by FoM on December 16, 2014 at 12:12:24 PT
I really hope this happens for Texas! We have had decrim since the 70s and it makes it not worthwhile financially for the police to care about it. That's what happened in my state when they changed the laws.
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Comment #1 posted by Hope on December 16, 2014 at 07:50:10 PT
Peace Train! Holy Roller!
Get on the peace train!Come on, Texas! Let's do this! More than this! Let's legalize across the board and create jobs founded in peace and freedom!Let's stop the great harm done to so many by this injustice for so long now. 
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