cannabisnews.com: Marijuana from Outlaw Status To Retail Shelves
function share_this(num) {
 tit=encodeURIComponent('Marijuana from Outlaw Status To Retail Shelves');
 url=encodeURIComponent('http://www.cannabisnews.com/news/28/thread28363.shtml');
 site = new Array(5);
 site[0]='http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u='+url+'&title='+tit;
 site[1]='http://www.stumbleupon.com/submit.php?url='+url+'&title='+tit;
 site[2]='http://digg.com/submit?topic=political_opinion&media=video&url='+url+'&title='+tit;
 site[3]='http://reddit.com/submit?url='+url+'&title='+tit;
 site[4]='http://del.icio.us/post?v=4&noui&jump=close&url='+url+'&title='+tit;
 window.open(site[num],'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=620,height=500');
 return false;
}






Marijuana from Outlaw Status To Retail Shelves
Posted by CN Staff on November 10, 2014 at 16:08:47 PT
By Jeff Mapes
Source: Oregonian
Oregon -- After voters in Washington and Colorado voted to legalize marijuana in 2012, Alison Holcomb would tell pot activists it was too early to say that the rest of America was ready to accept the drug.Holcomb, an American Civil Liberties Union official who managed Washington's legalization campaign, recalled that nearly a dozen states  including Oregon  decriminalized possession of small amounts of the drug in the 1970s.
"And then the '80s came and the pendulum swung back hard," she said, as President Ronald Reagan called marijuana "probably the most dangerous drug in America" and stepped up federal enforcement against all illegal drugs.Holcomb now feels more confident that marijuana will be widely legal after watching Oregon and Alaska voters approve the possession and retail sales.Legalization in two more states -- in a non-presidential year when fewer younger people vote  marks an important milestone in the drive to sweep away criminal penalties against a drug routinely used by millions of Americans, Holcomb and other activists say. On top of that, in Washington, D.C., voters said adults should be able to grow and possess the drug."A decade or a generation from now, people will look back on the marijuana wars and say, 'What the hell was that about," said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, the group that primarily funded Oregon's marijuana initiative. SnippedComplete Article: http://drugsense.org/url/Tq29R9FMSource: Oregonian, The (Portland, OR)Author: Jeff MapesPublished: November 10, 2014Copyright: 2014 The OregonianContact: letters news.oregonian.comWebsite: http://www.oregonlive.com/oregonian/CannabisNews  -- Cannabis Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/cannabis.shtml 
Home Comment Email Register Recent Comments Help 
     
     
     
     




Comment #4 posted by FoM on November 12, 2014 at 04:57:11 PT
The GCW
I agree.
[ Post Comment ]


Comment #3 posted by The GCW on November 11, 2014 at 17:53:50 PT
FoM and MikeEEEEE
So since the Repub's know if everyone did partake in the process, they would have not won, then they must know they are losers. Losers.They're just taking advantage of Us through and through. AmoebaSorta like:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfjKMpbJOs4
[ Post Comment ]


Comment #2 posted by FoM on November 11, 2014 at 04:43:01 PT
MikeEEEEE
I agree. That is why the Republicans won.
[ Post Comment ]


Comment #1 posted by MikeEEEEE on November 10, 2014 at 18:17:50 PT
Republican Nutjobs
The article brings up an important point, "in a non-presidential year when fewer younger people vote"Younger people usually don't vote republican.
Obviously, if they had voted, the outcome would have been different.
[ Post Comment ]


Post Comment