cannabisnews.com: Denver Appoints Marijuana Panel










††Denver Appoints Marijuana Panel

Posted by CN Staff on December 21, 2007 at 15:36:44 PT
By Kieran Nicholson, The Denver Post†
Source: Denver Post†

Colorado -- Ten members of an 11-seat pot panel were appointed this morning by Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper with the lone remaining seat open because the District Attorney's Office declined to participate. The appointments fulfill a mandate created by the passage of Initiated Question 100 in the November Denver election.
More than half - 57 percent - of Denver voters favored the initiative, making marijuana the city's lowest law enforcement priority. "We commend Mayor Hickenlooper for appointing the Marijuana Policy Review Panel and taking a step toward a more rational marijuana policy in Denver," said Mason Tvert, executive director of SAFER, a marijuana reform group which spearheaded the ordinance. "It is unfortunate that the District Attorney's Office is refusing to work with the rest of the city," Tvert said. Lynn Kimbrough, a spokeswoman for Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey, said her boss talked to the mayor last week about the panel and "politely" declined inclusion. "He let the mayor know that he is bound by the Constitution and his oath of office to exercise independent judgment," Kimbrough said. "It's a simple fact of law that he couldn't participate in a panel whose goal is to prioritize criminal prosecutions." The Marijuana Policy Review Panel must meet quarterly and issue a report on marijuana arrests and prosecutions. Appointed to the panel by the mayor, according to Tvert, are:  Snipped:Complete Article: http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_7781140Source: Denver Post (CO)Author:   Kieran Nicholson, The Denver Post Published: December 21, 2007 Copyright: 2007 The Denver Post CorpWebsite: http://www.denverpost.com/Contact: openforum denverpost.com Safer Choicehttp://www.saferchoice.org/CannabisNews -- Cannabis Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/cannabis.shtml

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Comment #23 posted by FoM on December 22, 2007 at 07:46:33 PT

Hope
I know they will enjoy her so much. Weimaraners almost seem human to me. They are very smart and comical too.
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Comment #22 posted by Hope on December 22, 2007 at 07:20:55 PT

Puppy
She's about fifteen weeks old and wants to play and scrap all the time. Their older dogs are a Dalmation they raised from a puppy early in their marriage about fifteen years ago. Their first pet. He's old and mostly cranky, and a bit blind and arthritic , and the other dog that lives there is a middle age dachshund female with a lot of personality and years and events with the family. The puppy warts them a lot, of course. Though it's much larger, at forty one pounds already, than the dachshund, the dachshund is completely dominate of him. My son says he sees them trying to get across to the puppy something like... "Why don't you lay down. See. Like this. Just walk around when you get up. Don't bounce all over everyone and everything. Lay down." The puppy even wears the children down, I think. Of course, they've already given up on all the responsible things they were going to do as far as taking care of it when they got their own wonderful new puppy dog. The new wears off fast. Especially when a forty pound puppy wets your bed, as happened to my grandson. The dachshund will play more than the dalmatian, my son told me, but the puppy wears her out. The old dalmatian male occasionally forgets his age and frisks around and plays a bit. The dog's name is Bella, but my three year old granddaughter calls her "Rubella".Merry Christmas and a less prohibitive New Year!
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Comment #21 posted by FoM on December 22, 2007 at 05:52:16 PT

Hope
They got a weimaraner puppy! They are so wonderful. If we were younger and could handle the energy of a weimaraner again I would buy one. We raised so many Weimaraners in our life and they are my favorite right alongside of Rottweilers. PS: As far as guns go we do own one but we don't keep it in our house. If someone needs something that bad I still wouldn't want to kill them. Material possessions just aren't that important to me. Merry Christmas!http://www.pamperedpuppy.com/images/contests/200412/winner02.jpg
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Comment #20 posted by Hope on December 22, 2007 at 03:48:11 PT

  PS
It's a fine thing... knowing that you all are out there.:0)Merry Christmas and a less prohibitive New Year!
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Comment #19 posted by Hope on December 22, 2007 at 03:45:26 PT

Merry Christmas and a less prohibitive New Year!
I'm jabbering to keep from getting to the tasks before me today."Peace on Earth" "Good will toward men.""Oh niiiiiight... oh night Divine."
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Comment #18 posted by Hope on December 22, 2007 at 03:39:46 PT

"finger on the trigger"
It's been a rule of mine for so many, many years not to keep my finger on the trigger, that it's completely natural to me if I pick up a gun of any kind.One training tool that I used for myself, and it worked very well, is the remembrance of a man that shot his adolescent daughter at close range, in the chest, and she died in his arms. It was night. She was supposed to be spending the night at a friend's house. He and his wife had been out for dinner. The teenage girls had returned to the house for something and when the girl heard her parents drive up... for some reason she thought it would be funny to hide in a closet and jump out and scare her daddy.As I recall, the last thing she was supposed to have said to him as she lay dying was, "It's ok, Daddy."
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Comment #17 posted by Hope on December 22, 2007 at 02:43:38 PT

Expert: drug dogs wrong 48% of time
http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/
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Comment #16 posted by Hope on December 21, 2007 at 21:37:54 PT

Prowlers, thieves, dogs, and guns.
There have been a few prowlers here over the years and I never shot at them. Prowlers and such a situation, for me, was never an opportunity to capture or kill or hurt anyone... it was an opportunity to run them off.I agree with you, FoM, about that dogs, especially large ones, often warn people off or make them rethink their plans. Although the night my son's dachshund was telling us, "There's someone taking the lawnmower! Stop thief! Stop thief!", my son was telling her to be quiet. Home invasion is a terrifying thought... and things can happen very quickly, amazingly quickly, in situations like the one your friend was in, Fight4Freedom. I hate it so bad for him and his family. I've seen a bit of violence and threatening in my life. The quickness of how fast things can happen at times like that is just stunning. There is no defense for the young men that did this to them. They were in the wrong, 100 percent, and that's all I will say about them.I've had two men, on two separate occasions, try to push their way in the door on me through the years and I didn't have to shoot at them. Thank God. I kicked a drunk's foot out of the door. He stuck his foot in the door when I tried to close it and although it took me several kicks at his foot to get it out of the door, he was too drunk to put up much of a fight. I got the door closed and woke my husband. The other time, my son, came to the rescue and asked the guy what his problem was. He didn't want to come in so bad when he saw my son, for some reason.If they were inside and threatening or grabbed or tried to grab me or mine, it would be a different matter. Someone's just being inside your home, though, even someone that shouldn't be there, isn't a good reason to shoot them on the spot, no questions asked. That's horrible.You've got to make a judgment, sometimes a pretty quick one, about who they are and what they are up to. I never go around with my finger on the trigger, even if I've heard or seen something and I feel there might be a threat that needs checking out. It takes little effort to move my finger that little distance... and it shouldn't be on the trigger in case I reflex or something.My grandfather had dementia and once went in a neighbor woman's house in the middle of the night. She woke up, frightened, but not out of her mind, and talked to him and called my grandmother. He went on another neighbor's place, not in his house, in the middle of the night and that neighbor didn't recognize him and called the law on him, but thankfully, didn't shoot him. He'd just get out and go to wandering sometimes. When he was younger he would walk miles and miles at night through the woods and fields hunting with his friends and running hounds after raccoons and foxes and I guess something in him would just send him out walking... good distances, sometimes in the daytime, sometimes at night.I would never want to hurt anyone. But I would protect myself or my family or friends or neighbors from someone who was intent on harming one of us. It would have been better if your friend could have handled it without shooting someone... but I can understand his feeling threatened. I, personally, wouldn't shoot someone to protect a possession, I don't think... but I would to prevent a murder or rape or serious assault. Hollering, making noise, like the racking of a shotgun, can all be helpful, too, I think. That sound of a shotgun being racked is enough to stop anyone that's not insane. I've hollered things, like, "Get the hell out of here!" "Hey! What do you think you're doing? You better get yourself out of here, and right now!" or "I am armed and I will shoot you." Of course, most of the time, I'm sure, on the few occasions that something like that has happened in my long life, there was probably actually no one there or no threat. An animal perhaps. We have actually seen prowlers at least three times, and known they were here two other times, over these more than forty years in this house, not counting the two guys who tried to push their way in. But I've hollered threats into the darkness two or three times in my life. Confidently and with purpose, too.Once a woodpecker that sounded exactly like someone knocking on the wall outside the bathroom window made me holler, "Hey! What do you want?" I scared him off... and that's when I saw "he" was a big woodpecker with an odd attraction to a brick veneer wall.My daughter caught a window peeper outside her bathroom window. She chased him down and held him at gunpoint, but she didn't kill him or even shoot him. That same day, I think, or certainly within a day or two, we got a big black German Shepherd for her. The one I've told you about that would follow people on the other side of the fence like some sort of stalking panther. A big protective dog won't slow down the killer with a badge too much or an outright maniac killer bent on mayhem, but it will slow down most gnarly, abusive, or drunken types and thieves and sometimes, often, help them decide to change their plans. I've had it happen personally. We, the children and I, were traveling when the incidents happened. In one, at a motel, late at night, a guy started beating on our door and screaming at us to turn the tv down, which we didn't even have on. He was screaming and beating viciously on the door, but when the hundred pound Weimaraner went to the door and started talking to the guy screaming and banging on the other side, loudly and clearly, the guy suddenly decided to leave the kids and I alone. Regardless of what he thought he heard, he knew he heard a big, not wanting to play, dog. There were other incidents traveling that people backed off that were threatening us in some way. Once I got stopped, and the dog had a fit when the officer approached... like he was supposed to. Blueboy was very protective and watchful and he put on a very fierce warning and defensive display and was very large, but he never bit anyone that I know of. A "Talking" dog... one that can explain the situation to someone very clearly about how they should back off and stay away from it's people and, at the same time, not be truly vicious, or too dangerous, is a wonderful animal.I got out of the car and I apologized to the Highway Patrolman that he warned away from us, and he said it was perfectly all right. He would rather see a woman and kids traveling out on those long highways with a protective animal than not. Well there was a couple of times that people who had no ill will or ideas had to stop and freeze when the dog accidentally got loose and told them in no uncertain terms to "Halt right there!" and went to inspect them and what they might be up to. No one ever got really mad at me about it, because, for one thing, he didn't actually hurt them.But all in all.... a good and sizable dog is a wonderful pal at times when people are behaving belligerently or dangerously towards you. Blueboy, when we traveled with him, also went ahead of us into any room or rooms we stayed at and inspected every nook, cranny, closet, bathroom and bedroom, then came back to the door and told us with a smile and a tail wag, to, "Come on in"... it was safe. It was so funny. He wasn't taught to do that... but he always did. Once I told the maids that were headed for a room we were staying in, and we were leaving for a short while, not to go in there, they didn't need to clean it, and that there was a big dog in there. We didn't reach the the elevators before I heard the ruckus and din down the hall toward our room, and the maids came scrambling away from the door, closing it as quickly as they could... "There really is a dog in there!" and a bunch of Spanish I didn't understand. Well yes, there was. He loved to ride in elevators, too, and a couple of times got on before we did and the doors started to close, and once, did close completely on his leash before we could join him inside. In memory, I can still see it clearly happen. It scared me. He knew how to heel, but we weren't making him heel at those times. Luckily there were people inside the elevator that caught the door. He never fussed or behaved in an unfriendly manner to people in elevators. He was always very friendly and polite to them. He was so happy to get to join them for the ride, I think. He loved to go and ride, even on elevators. I had a weapon with me on several of those threatening occasions I mentioned above, but shooting someone is never the first option in dealing with a situation, or it shouldn't be. Having a weapon should make you less fearful, and not more fearful, and thus, more likely to shoot someone. Little dogs are sweet and they voice warnings very well, but a big dog makes perhaps, some not so nice people give a bit more thought to whether they really want to tangle with the dog or not. The dogs I've had have all handled such threatening situations very well, and I thanked God for having them.My son got a Weimaraner pup, a girl, for his family just a few weeks ago.
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Comment #15 posted by FoM on December 21, 2007 at 19:55:07 PT

Dankhank
Thank you and Merry Christmas. That was good. I get to see my nephew tomorrow who is back from Iraq for a week or so. I am looking forward to hearing how it is where he is working. He isn't allowed to go outside the Marine base where he fixes air conditioning in the tanks that get shot up but I'm sure he will have some stories to tell.
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Comment #14 posted by Dankhank on December 21, 2007 at 19:38:21 PT

viola .....
http://play.rhapsody.com/bellamybrothers/thereasonfortheseason/oldhippiechristmas?didAutoplayBounce=truePeaceful Christmas ... all ...
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Comment #13 posted by FoM on December 21, 2007 at 19:05:39 PT

fight_4_freedom 
That is a sad situation. I am not a gun type person but I do have two big dogs that I would let loose if someone tried to break into our house. Dogs alert quickly and often will scare a thief off I believe. 
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Comment #12 posted by fight_4_freedom on December 21, 2007 at 18:47:52 PT:

A fellow MINORML member in a bad situation
Definitely worth a read. He's innocent and I feel terrible for him and his wife.By JO MATHIS
The Ann Arbor NewsA Lima Township man will likely be out of jail and home for Christmas as he awaits trial on charges that he shot a teenager who police say came to his house to steal drugs.Seven people calling themselves the "Gersh Home for Christmas Committee" picketed outside Washtenaw County's 14A District Court Thursday in hopes of reducing the bail and dropping the charges against Gershom L. Avery.Avery waived his right to a preliminary hearing Thursday and will be back for a pretrial hearing Jan. 18 before Judge Donald Shelton. But his wife, Judy, left the courthouse with a smile, insisting she'll come up with the $7,500 to get him released."I'm thankful," she said. Her husband has been in jail since Nov. 11 on $250,000 bond.Police say Skyler J. Galloway, 18, Daniel L. Buckenburger, 20, and Bradley J. Tyler, 20, went to Avery's home in the 9000 block of Dexter-Chelsea Road on Nov. 11 to steal drugs.Avery, 53, allegedly shot Galloway and was arrested that night. He is charged with assault with intent to commit murder, assault with intent to do great bodily harm less than murder, felonious assault, use of a firearm in the commission of a felony, and manufacturing marijuana.Galloway, Buckenburger and Tyler were charged with attempted home invasion and conspiracy to commit home invasion.......
rest of article with pic of some of our members outside the courthouse
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Comment #11 posted by FoM on December 21, 2007 at 18:40:39 PT

John Lennon: Happy X-Mas - War is Over
Maybe war will be over or almost over in 08.http://boss.streamos.com/wmedia/capi001/johnlennon/happyxmas/video/happyxmas_v100.asx
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Comment #10 posted by FoM on December 21, 2007 at 18:32:42 PT

Hope
I understand about John and John. I looked for a song called an Old Hippie Christmas. A friend heard it on the radio but I can't find it online anywhere to hear it.
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Comment #9 posted by FoM on December 21, 2007 at 18:30:17 PT

John Tyler 
Have a Very Merry Christmas and a Safe and Happy New Year. I am very excited about the New Year that's almost here.
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Comment #8 posted by Hope on December 21, 2007 at 17:56:23 PT

John Tyler
Oh. That's a good wish. I wish it to you, too. You have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy and less prohibitive New Year, too!
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Comment #7 posted by John Tyler on December 21, 2007 at 17:53:01 PT

To all
If I donít get to get back on until after Christmas I would like to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy and less prohibitive New Year.
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Comment #6 posted by Hope on December 21, 2007 at 17:42:45 PT

I think
I just ate five pieces of Divinity.
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Comment #5 posted by Hope on December 21, 2007 at 17:41:40 PT

I was thinking this time of John Lennon.
But we often think about the other John in much the same way. John Fitzgerald Kennedy.
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Comment #4 posted by Hope on December 21, 2007 at 17:38:34 PT

Oh my gosh.
That's what we are!Some of us anyway.
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Comment #3 posted by Hope on December 21, 2007 at 17:37:21 PT

Old Hippie
Oh my gosh.Just today, I was thinking about John and why?
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Comment #2 posted by The GCW on December 21, 2007 at 17:16:18 PT

Let Us destroy cannabis prohibition.
Quote: "Denver police and prosecutors have said possessing marijuana continues to violate state and federal laws." That law in effect says cannabis is bad etc. That law places cannabis along with heroin as a Schedule I substance.That is discredited law. Prohibitionists wish to continue discriminating against cannabis users and I believe if there were not laws to stop them they would also discriminate against minorities too.Now they are the minority.Perhaps We should discriminate against cannabis prohibitionists.When I Am considering doing business with a company or individual and I have a choice to avoid cannabis prohibitionists -I simply flush that toilet.-0-There is another form of law that I have obedient respect for. It is the Biblical law of loving one another and it always comes before state and federal law.God's law of love one another and the disobedience of that law makes the state and federal kings evil; doing the works of the devil.I know the mayor of Denver wants to allow His guards to continue caging citizens for using the relatively safe God-given plant cannabis (kaneh bosm), but that is an evil luciferous sin. We can not allow Ourselves to partake in sin; can not support or enable it. 1 John 3:8; "the one who practices sin is of the devil; for the devil has sinned from the beginning (The beginning of the Bible / the 1st page is where God says cannabis is good; that's where the the devil starts attempting to make people sin; from the beginning). The Son of God appeared for this purpose, to destroy the works of the devil."Let Us destroy cannabis prohibition.-0-By the devil getting people sinning from the beginning (the very 1st page), by the time We get to where the lessons of murder start on page 3, people are lost; and what We have now is war war war. It would appear that the devil must be stopped and by stopping Him on the 1st page / the beginning, We will be able to move forward and stop the devil on the war / killing / murder issue.Before We can get people to stop supporting war and the troops, We must stop the sins in the proper order.Cannabis prohibition, persecution and extermination is the Biblical root of all evil.Cannabis is a spiritual plant; it's persecution is a spiritual war.We must destroy that sin.We must destroy the works of the devil.Destroy.The Green Collar Worker
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Comment #1 posted by FoM on December 21, 2007 at 16:07:29 PT

OT: Bellamy Brother: Old Hippie
Merry Christmas to all our hippie friends.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05PBA_F23hg
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