cannabisnews.com: High Crimes, or A Tokin' Figure?










††High Crimes, or A Tokin' Figure?

Posted by CN Staff on March 17, 2006 at 23:23:35 PT
By Doug Struck, Washington Post Foreign Service†
Source: Washington Post†

Vancouver -- Sweet marijuana smoke tumbles down the steps from "the Vapor Lounge," a corner of Marc Emery's bookstore where customers toke up at will."We get high with everybody," Emery says, shrugging. "This is a pilgrimage spot, and people come here from all over the world. We get high." Illegal? Yes.
So were the seeds he used to keep in a case in the store, with exotic names like Afghan Dream and Chemo Grizzly. So was the booming business he ran, complete with glossy seed catalogues describing the subtle and sublime nuances of his varieties. ("Nebula: Fruity flavor and scent. Transcendental buzz. Harvest outdoor.") So, for that matter, are the other marijuana businesses that have sprouted up in the block around his Vancouver bookstore. The street is nicknamed "Vansterdam," with pot-hazy cafes, headshops filled with pipes and bongs, and neon signs advertising illegal seed sales.Until recently, nobody much cared, it seemed. The police hadn't bothered to come around for eight years. Before that, they busted Emery for seed sales and raided him four times. But he just got fined -- once with "a nice speech from the judge saying what a nice person I was and how marijuana probably shouldn't be illegal," Emery says -- and the police stopped trying.In truth, Emery hated being ignored. He tried to stir up notoriety. Every year, he filled out his income taxes listing his occupation as "Marijuana Seed Vendor," paying heftily and honestly, he says, on his multimillion-dollar business. The Canadian Revenue Service never questioned him.He told the Canada post office he was getting and sending his seeds through the mail. They never stopped delivery. He started the B.C. Marijuana Party, fielded 79 candidates in 2001, and ran repeatedly for local and federal offices. He never won.He broadcast "Pot-TV" on the Internet, entertained politicians, and openly funded marches, lawsuits and marijuana-legalization drives from Arizona to Israel to Washington, D.C.When it was too quiet at home, he would go somewhere to rattle up a pro-pot demonstration. He would light up a fat joint in front of a police station, daring the cops to arrest him.Twenty-one times they did. Usually he got off, or was released after a night in jail, or fined. His longest stretch was 61 days in jail in 2004, ordered by a Saskatoon judge clearly irked at Emery's in-your-face apologia. No big deal, Emery says. He read the Bible behind bars.Then came the DEA.Emery figured something was up when a strange young woman pestered him to buy 10 pounds of pot. He refused. She bought some seeds at his store, asked for tips about how to hide them to go to the States, and left.Eight days later, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and Vancouver police tromped into his store, ordered the customers out, taped paper over the windows and began hauling out computers and files. Emery, on the other side of Canada to speak near Halifax at the Atlantic Hemp Festival, was grabbed by six plainclothes policemen as he left a restaurant.Emery is "one of the attorney general's most wanted international drug trafficking targets," the DEA in Washington crowed on July 29, 2005, announcing an extradition request for Emery and two employees. Emery's bust, the DEA said, was "a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade but also to the marijuana legalization movement."And he thought trying to change the law was legal, Emery muses.So did lots of other Canadians, it turned out. Emery's arrest for extradition on U.S. "drug kingpin" charges, carrying a minimum sentence of 10 years to life in prison, outraged many in Canada. They resented the long reach of America's law and what they saw as the United States' fevered preoccupation with pot."They need to leave our country alone," complained a letter to the editor in the London (Ontario) Free Press. "If we wanted to prosecute Emery we would, but it is not worth our time and money.""Marc's business was known to police and every level of government," intoned a columnist in the Vancouver Province. To arrest him now "is petty and dishonest."Todd Greenberg, the assistant U.S. attorney handling the case in Seattle, says Canada's apparent tolerance of Emery's seed business does not make the U.S. bid to prosecute him unfair."What Canada does or does not do is not particularly relevant to us," he says. "We are prosecuting him for what he did in our country -- distributing millions and millions of marijuana seeds in the United States. When someone does that, the United States has the obligation to enforce our laws whether that person is physically located here or overseas."Greenberg says the charges brought by a federal grand jury followed an 18-month investigation in which DEA agents repeatedly found Marc Emery's seeds at the root of illegal marijuana "grow ops." He insists Emery's legalization campaigns did not affect the charges.That sounds hollow to Bruce Mirken, a spokesman for the Washington-based Marijuana Policy Project that Emery says he helped finance (contributors are confidential, the organization says). The DEA's public boast to have dealt a blow to "the legalization movement" showed its hand, Mirken says."This is a democracy. We are supposed to be able to talk about whether our laws make any sense."Year after year they roll out ad campaigns that attempt to demonize marijuana," Mirken notes. "They consider it the number one drug threat in America. That always struck us as bizarre."If the DEA tries to demonize marijuana, Emery runs a multimedia juggernaut to sanctify it. In addition to his irreverent Internet site, his Cannabis Culture magazine comes out every other month, a slick magazine chockablock with advertisements by seed vendors and hydroponics suppliers, articles on growing lush and potent plants, and even a "pot puzzler" crossword. He says he distributes 75,000 copies.Emery's bookstore is a cheerful dispensary for books and magazines on marijuana, bongs and pipes of every conceivable design, T-shirts, pot cookbooks, grinders, vaporizers, mushroom spores, and hemp clothing.And then there is Emery himself. At 48, he looks more like a Young Republican than a stoner who calls himself the Prince of Pot. As often as not, he is in a coat and tie, with neatly combed hair, an earnest expression, with a good sound bite for the TV. He has been a soccer coach and a foster parent. Married, divorced and soon to remarry -- to Jodie Giesz-Ramsay, 21, who transcribed his jailhouse musings and now helps edit his magazine.He talks with a machine-gun style unmellowed by his admitted custom of a daily joint or two. He compares himself to Martin Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi. He had to apologize last year for calling a federal minister a "Nazi," and he won no PR points when he spat on a policeman during a 2000 arrest of one of his employees.Emery's life is the limelight. For 17 years, he ran a used-book store in Ontario, and publicly challenged a business fee, his town's bid for the 1991 Pan American Games, its Sunday shopping laws and pornography laws. In 1990 he flouted the prohibition against selling High Times magazine, then banned as "illicit drug literature." He helped win that battle, getting the law overturned, and found his calling in the marijuana movement.He wound up in British Columbia, a tolerant corner of a tolerant country. The official statistics agency of Canada says 45 percent of Canadians over age 15 have used marijuana. Possession and use is legal for medical purposes, and the former Liberal government tried to make possession of pot a matter of a small fine.The legislation did not pass, but the laws on marijuana and sales of seeds are often overlooked. Until his arrest in July, Emery says only two people had ever been prosecuted for selling seeds, and both had simply been fined.So Emery sold and sold. He accepted seed orders of the 534 varieties listed in his catalogue or on the Internet only with money orders that could not be easily traced. He got and sent seeds through the Canadian Postal Service, and then destroyed the records, he says."I sold millions of seeds proudly to people all over the world," and perhaps 70 percent of them were mailed to the United States, he concedes. "Everything the DEA said is correct -- except I don't buy the charge that I'm poisoning children of America."Emery says he did it all for the movement, not for profit. He claims to have funneled more than $3 million to marches, candidates, lawsuits and ballot drives over a decade. He says he paid taxes and kept very little. He lives modestly in his fiancee's apartment. He doesn't own a car or a house, investments or fancy jewelry, he says.Emery will get a judicial hearing in Canada later this year. The Canadian justice minister in the new conservative government could block the extradition, but he is a tough-talking former prosecutor and Emery acknowledges his chances are "slim odds indeed.""In the U.S, I have every confidence I would get a minimum of 30 years," Emery says in an interview in the basement of his bookstore. "I'll get a longer sentence than I'd get in Canada for multiple murder, for something no one in Canada has ever gone to jail for."Here is the twist: Emery welcomes it. Almost."I'm interested in whatever would legalize pot fastest," he says. "Part of me believes that going to jail will accelerate that process. And part of me believes that if I die in jail it will accelerate it even faster."That is as much for Emery's devotion to the spotlight as devotion to the cause, he concedes."I'm very interested to see what happens to me, because I think I am a person of destiny," he says, with no trace of modesty. "I haven't been fearful since the moment I was arrested. I just felt my time has finally come. . . ."I've already got this grand-scale epic going in my head. I am out to destroy the DEA and defeat them. And they are out to destroy me."Note: Canadians Find the 'Prince of Pot' Harmless. The DEA Begs to Differ.Source: Washington Post (DC)Author: Doug Struck, Washington Post Foreign ServicePublished: Saturday, March 18, 2006; C01Copyright: 2006 Washington Post Contact: letterstoed washpost.comWebsite: http://www.washingtonpost.com/ Related Articles: CBS: 60 Minutes Prince of Pot ~ Transcript http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread21645.shtml Prince of Pot Fights Extradition on Drug Chargeshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/thread21224.shtmlJust What Did Emery Expect?http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread21011.shtml

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Comment #37 posted by FoM on March 21, 2006 at 07:48:51 PT

WP: Upcoming Chat With Marc Emery
Canadian "Prince of Pot" Sought By U.S.
If Extradited Marijuana Advocate Marc Emery Could Face Jail TimeMarc Emery, Cannabis Culture MagazineTime: Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 12:00 PMMarc Emery, the Canadian "Prince of Pot" who faces possible extradition to the U.S., will be online Tuesday, March 21, at noon ET to discuss the recent Post article on his case and his open advocacy of marijuana legalization. Emery, who published Cannabis Culture magazine and runs a bookstore where patrons can get high, has been arrested multiple times in Canada but faces a much longer sentence if he is extradited to and convicted in the U.S.Link: http://tinyurl.com/h5923
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Comment #36 posted by whig on March 19, 2006 at 11:43:12 PT

Marc
Yeah, that's my point too. I'm not trying to argue with you, just saying I have a different perspective and we should all respect one another, and we all have the same right to complain about prohibition and how it's hurting people.
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Comment #35 posted by Marc Paquette on March 19, 2006 at 11:35:11 PT:

whig
Obviously, we're not on the same wavelength, but as long as we acheive with success to the same conclusion..the END of MARIJUANA PROHIBITION! :)I don't disrespect those who chose different paths to obtain the same goal..as long as it's done in peace!Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #34 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 19:51:53 PT

Jose
Yes, you can absolutely do both if you think you should. A square is also a rectangle, as you say. But I'm neither one. Call me a circle, if you like. I don't believe in the state. Expressing this idea is hard to get across to people nowadays, because it is just so generally accepted as being necessary to social existence, like the church was in the middle ages.Consider that medieval perspective for a moment, and say the church was persecuting us. Some people would say, we should reform the church, and petition. Some might enter the priesthood, and try to change things through that approach. Some might become protestant, and set up a new church. But I'd still be standing on the outside trying to explain that the church has no authority to dictate to me how I should live and I do not adhere to it.Nothing I say is intended to compel you or Marc or anyone else to reject the church or the state, you can adhere to either or both if you like.
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Comment #33 posted by jose Melendez on March 18, 2006 at 18:47:39 PT

and not or
With respect to Comment #32, perhaps these ideas are not mutually exclusive?I may be a square, but if so, I'm certainly also a rectangle . . .
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Comment #32 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 18:30:07 PT

Marc
Principal or not, if we want some politicians that will end marijuana prohibition, the only to do it is through the voting process..unless you have a better solution my friend?I do have a better solution, but it's a slower process. Talk to people. Help them understand how cannabis helps make people feel better. Encourage people to learn how it can help their loved ones and themselves. Gradual social change. One person at a time, if necessary.When the majority of people agree with us, and the strength of our support is sufficient to resist continued prohibition, it will end. It will not require finding good politicians. Prohibitionist politicians simply won't be able to be elected.You think we can change the minds of hardcore right-wing prohibitionists like Mr Dubya and John P Walters..with some protests, or it would be more effective if we would vote them out of office?If you are engaging with the political system, you are accepting its authority to decide such things. You cannot convince them, nor would I try. Vote them out of office? Who is running against them? Was Bill Clinton our friend? Would John Kerry have legalized cannabis? Do you really think we win when we have a feasible choice of two prohibitionists?I'm not saying this to suggest that the present administration isn't the worst administration in our history. It is. It is dreadful. All the more reason I would avoid any direct engagement with them. I'd rather speak against their authority from outside the system, than encourage people to believe that Hillary Clinton would exercise similar authority in a better way.Are we fair to ourselves if we abstain from our right to chose the ones who will represent what we want?Do you think your rights are limited to choosing representatives? I am not represented by anyone. I speak for myself. My point of view does not carry the force of law, and I would never allow anyone to enforce my will, nor delegate such authority. I rely on persuasion, which can be surprisingly effective.Is it fair to say that others who do vote will decide for you?This presumes I accept their choice as binding me. It does not.Again, if you have a better solution, I'm all ears! :)I'd appreciate hearing your response.
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Comment #31 posted by Hope on March 18, 2006 at 17:23:20 PT

Sam
They reported well the injustice done to Jonathan Magbie. What happened to him woke a few people up.It seems I've heard the post is not doing well, though. Perhaps since they fear they are going to be out of the picture, they decided to report real news and real repression while they could.Although I hope they aren't going down. We need good reporting like this.
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Comment #30 posted by Marc Paquette on March 18, 2006 at 16:20:48 PT:

whig
Principal or not, if we want some politicians that will end marijuana prohibition, the only to do it is through the voting process..unless you have a better solution my friend?You think we can change the minds of hardcore right-wing prohibitionists like Mr Dubya and John P Walters..with some protests, or it would be more effective if we would vote them out of office?Are we fair to ourselves if we abstain from our right to chose the ones who will represent what we want?Is it fair to say that others who do vote will decide for you?Again, if you have a better solution, I'm all ears! :)Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #29 posted by Sam Adams on March 18, 2006 at 13:45:10 PT

Hope
I thought the same thing - good going, Washington Post. And I'm sure they only took notice after the 60 minutes story, so good going, 60 minutes! I keep hoping that the Democratic Party will wake up to the opportunity of MJ reform. The Post coming around to our side is surely a good sign.

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Comment #28 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 13:03:23 PT

Marc
Some of us don't vote as a matter of principle, and to say that we have no right to complain is neither true nor fair.
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Comment #27 posted by Hope on March 18, 2006 at 12:25:49 PT

The Washington Post
Good for them for printing "all the news", and not just the government propaganda pieces.
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Comment #26 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 11:39:08 PT

Marc
I understand what you're saying.
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Comment #25 posted by Marc Paquette on March 18, 2006 at 11:34:51 PT:

FoM
Dear FoM;The name of the political party isn't important, it's the politician in charge that takes the decisions! :)Next elections, vote for an anti-prohibitionist politician to be in charge, and it should solve the problem.If the majority of Americans are against prohibition, it will happen..sooner or later.Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #24 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 10:36:15 PT

Marc
I vote against something rather then for someone. I don't believe there is any political party that thinks the way I do so how can I get behind one of them?
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Comment #23 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 10:34:34 PT

Marc
I plan on voting this fall. I will vote one way and one way only. 
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Comment #22 posted by Marc Paquette on March 18, 2006 at 10:32:00 PT:

But we must!
We must complain and stand up for our rights dear friend..it's in a song from Bob Marley..right?Unless there's an other solution to end marijuana prohibtion?Only talking about it without doing anything to solve the problem isn't worth much..dont' you agree FoM? :)Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #21 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 10:29:20 PT

Marc
I wanted to say I did vote this past time. I might vote the next time to make sure we change the direction we are going. 
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Comment #20 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 10:22:23 PT

Marc
I really try hard not to do a lot of complaining. 
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Comment #19 posted by Marc Paquette on March 18, 2006 at 10:20:02 PT:

Don't vote?
Hi again FoM;I don't mean to be disrespectful, but if you want marijuana legalization, then you will need to vote and support a political party and (or) politicians who will end marijuana prohibition.There's an old saying that says: "If you don't vote, you can't complain".Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #18 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 10:10:08 PT

Whig
I'm not diagreeing with what Marc said. I just don't understand politics. I only voted a couple times in my life. It isn't something I care to put my energy into. 
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Comment #17 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 09:58:23 PT

FoM
I think Marc's point is well taken, in a free country people are entitled to hold diverse political (or, as in my case, apolitical) viewpoints, without risk of imprisonment for simply holding a point of view out of the mainstream.Canada prides itself on being a free country, and it is no longer the case that people are held to legal jeopardy for supporting unpopular parties like the Communists. This isn't to endorse the Communist Party, only to say that people shouldn't be jailed for such sympathies.But Marc Emery is targeted for his political views.
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Comment #16 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 09:53:47 PT

Marc
It sort of makes sense but I am not into politics so a lot of political issues don't register with me. I want the laws change concerning cannabis. That's about my total focus when it comes to doing CNews. After the laws are changed then people will be able to sell seeds, sell cannabis, make cannabis candy, develop coffee shops etc. 
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Comment #15 posted by Marc Paquette on March 18, 2006 at 09:44:09 PT:

That's okay FoM
Hi FoM :)I wanted to edit and correct the error in my title when I first posted my comment, but you don't have this feature in your forums...thanks for deleting it for me!What I meant with the Communist Party is that it used to be illegal before the inception of our Canadian Charter of Rights, and those who were partisans were thrown in jail, and in some cases, some got executed as traitors! Today, Canada has at least 8 fully legal political parties including a Communist Party, but they have very little support.The "marijuana legalization" party in Canada is called the Marijuana Party of Canada, and they also have a "Marijuana Party" in the U.S.The first paragraph of DEA's Karen Tandy statement reads as follows:"Today's DEA arrest of Marc Scott Emery, publisher of Cannabis Culture Magazine, and the founder of a marijuana legalization group- is a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade in the U.S. and Canada, but also to the marijuana legalization movement."This paragraph is clearly political oppression of a political choice, and under our Charter rights, this is not permitted and totally illegal.If Marc Emery, Michelle Rainey and Greg Williams would not have operated their seed business under the protection of a political party, then the situation would have been quite different.Hope that it's clear now.Have a nice day FoM and Friends! :)Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #14 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 09:05:06 PT

Marc
I don't understand this sentence. I know I don't know anyone who supports Communists. Your comment: In the 60s, 50s and before, people used to go in prison if they were proven to support the Communist Party!
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Comment #13 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 09:01:10 PT

Marc
I removed the double post. I'm saying that more for anyone who might wonder where comment 11 went.
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Comment #12 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 08:51:27 PT

MSNBC: High crimes, or a tokiní figure?
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11865883/
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Comment #10 posted by Marc Paquette on March 18, 2006 at 08:43:28 PT:

DEA's Karen Tandy didn't knews !
Dear Friends:Clearly, the DEA's intentions and goal were not only to punish Marc Emery, Michelle Rainey and Greg Williams for exporting marijuana seeds to U.S., but it was and still is politically persecuting a political party called the "Marijuana Party" in both Canada and U.S., their leaders, voters and followers, and millions of marijuana consumers in North America!The DEA clearly wanted to put a dent and an end of a political movement to legalize marijuana.Political oppression is not permitted and tolerated under our Canadian Charter of Rights, and what they have said in their statement is clearly a violation of Marc's, Michelle's and Greg's political choices and rights!Our government will tolerate this Charter right violation and agree for extradition?Any Canadian judge with a sound mind and knows the law will realize immediately that the DEA's actions were a political matter as well!In the 60s, 50s and before, people used to go in prison if they were proven to support the Communist Party!I believe that DEA's Karen Tandy might have put her foot in her mouth with her statement!Click on the following link for DEA's Karen Tandy statement:http://medpot.net/forums//index.php?showtopic=24514Marc
http://medpot.net
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Comment #9 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 08:41:43 PT

mayan
Thank you for the poll results. It's hard for me to even figure out how 33% don't understand. 
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Comment #8 posted by FoM on March 18, 2006 at 07:58:38 PT

Toker00 and Sukoi
I haven't comment about the movie because I don't understand what it is about. I figured Herbdoc215 will drop in and explain it to us. I thought Steve was working on Jerry's case and I was hoping for good news soon. 
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Comment #7 posted by mai_bong_city on March 18, 2006 at 07:50:28 PT

buying bridgeville.
i just read that the town of bridgeville in humboldt county is going up for auction on e-bay again. starting bid 1.75 million.
it's got eighty-some acres on a river and some houses and gee, i would love to see a farm there - cannabis and hemp, fruits and veggies......
i would change the name to cannabisville.well for those who might actually be able to pull it off, it's out there. so many possibilities - i'm running down to get a lottery ticket now!
a dream is a wish your heart makes......
mai b c

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Comment #6 posted by Toker00 on March 18, 2006 at 07:21:31 PT

Sukoi
This is really good news that I don't think has sunk in yet for most of us. His story is intimately intwined with everyone who is posting here. His story is OUR story. I wouldn't be surprised if the movie includes something about c-news and Jerry Sisson, and FoM's commitment to helping end Cannabis Prohibition. And maybe not by name, but in a subtle reference. The recognition will be richly deserved by Steve, FoM, and all others who fight the LIES Of DEAth. The movement progresses."Emery is "one of the attorney general's most wanted international drug trafficking targets," the DEA in Washington crowed on July 29, 2005, announcing an extradition request for Emery and two employees. Emery's bust, the DEA said, was "a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade but also to the marijuana legalization movement."Is that why it took so long to walk across the street and arrest him? And you think arresting ONE cannabist will end our movement??? That is Truly Laughable. LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL!John Walters is sooooooo naive. Emery is irrelevant to the legalization movement. Sure, he did so very much to SPEED our movement, and GROW it, but Cannabis Liberation is a natural, Humanitarian issue. Emery is, respectfully, the Posture child of our movement. But Marc was just the spark, we are the inferno.You waited too long to stake your claim of victory, John. You are like Bush. You claim victory where none exists. The seeds Marc provided have grown, matured, been harvested, smoked, eaten, and exhaled and the new crops planted time and again, and you can never stop it. We frustrate you just as much as you frustrate us, don't we John? Liars hate hearing the truth as much as truth seekers hate hearing the lies. We have you in check, Walters, and our next move will be CHECK MATE. END OF CANNABIS PROHIBITION!New World Peace, not New World Order.Wage peace on war. END CANNABIS PROHIBITION NOW! 
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Comment #5 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 07:07:35 PT

No freedom without tyranny
It's related to the problem of good and evil, which is the nature of free will. In the absence of tyrannical impulses, and unless those impulses are ever acted upon and properly perceived as a threat to the rest of us, unless they are given sufficiently free rein for a time, however terrible it is, we do not recognize our choice, we do not value our liberty, we do not protect it. Trust that all suffering is for a purpose, that we will remember.Would the American colonists have rebelled were it not for the long train of abuses and usurpations by the British king? We are in the midst of a greater social revolution today, and we will prevail.Wage PEACE on war.
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Comment #4 posted by whig on March 18, 2006 at 06:27:31 PT

mayan
The bottom is nowhere in sight.That's literally true. The bottom of the visible graph is 20%. I think we can expect him to drop below that eventually.
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Comment #3 posted by mayan on March 18, 2006 at 05:58:21 PT

Still Sinking
The latest Pew Research Center poll has Bush with his lowest rating ever...Bush Approval: Raw Poll Data:
http://www.pollkatz.homestead.com/files/pollkatzmainGRAPHICS_8911_image001.gifThe bottom is nowhere in sight.
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Comment #2 posted by mayan on March 18, 2006 at 05:37:52 PT

Revealing
Emery's bust, the DEA said, was "a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade but also to the marijuana legalization movement."And he thought trying to change the law was legal, Emery muses.The real reason the DEA went after Emery is revealed! The marijuana legalization movement is in the cross-hairs of the fascists. Even the DEA is not so stupid as to believe that they can eradicate cannabis from the streets of America, or even make it difficult to find. They are now primarily concerned with keeping cannabis illegal! Working within the law to change the law is now grounds for harrassment from the DEAth goons.THE WAY OUT IS THE WAY IN...20 reasons to question the official story of 9/11:
http://www.st911.org/IntroductionToS911T.html PENTAGON RESEARCH:
http://www.pentagonresearch.com/Don't Whine - Grow a Spine: 
http://georgewashington.blogspot.com/2006/03/dont-whine-grow-spine.htmlWhat Destroyed The WTC?
http://www.explosive911analysis.com/Unplug the War Machine By Facing the Disturbing Truth of 9/11:
http://www.911sharethetruth.com/
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Comment #1 posted by Sukoi on March 18, 2006 at 05:25:43 PT

OT: Steve Tuck, the Movie...
http://www.marijuananews.com/news.php3?sid=890
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