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  'High Noon' Leaves Diag Smoking
Posted by CN Staff on April 05, 2004 at 07:40:46 PT
By Ashley Dinges & Donn M. Fresard 
Source: Michigan Daily  

cannabis The smell of incense wafted through the Diag Saturday as costumed demonstrators, middle-aged activists and hacky-sack-playing students gathered together amid the sound of bongo drums to participate in Ann Arbor’s 33rd Annual Hash Bash.

Hash Bash organizer Adam Brook said he was pleased with the turnout, which the University’s Department of Public Safety estimated at 1,500. Brook had previously said he expected 50,000 people to attend.

The event began at the Ann Arbor Federal Building at 11 a.m., when demonstrators congregated and marched to the Diag for the “High Noon” rally. Attendees later moved to Monroe Street for a block party.

Speakers at the noon gathering included writer Jack Herer, author of “The Emperor Wears No Clothes,” poet John Sinclair and George Sherfield, director of the Michigan chapter of the National Organization for the Reformation of Marijuana Laws.

“In the end this was one of the best we’ve had in years,” Brook said.

A main focus of this year’s event was the issue of marijuana use for medical purposes. Julie Bonnett, a musician and hemp vendor, was one of several women dressed as a “naughty nurse” in order to promote awareness of the medical marijuana initiative.

“Today we’re in support of the medicinal marijuana, because the drug war needs to be ended,” Bonnett said.

Bonnett wore jewelry made of fake marijuana leaves and a nurse costume which read, “Free the weed.”

DPS reported six arrests for violation of the controlled substance act, in this case marijuana. Two of the six were University students.

DPS only issued tickets for the “High Noon” event. The Ann Arbor Police Department was responsible for issuing violations for the Federal Building march and the Monroe Street block party, but they said they could not provide statistics for the number of arrests.

“(Arrests in) the last two years are considerably down from previous years, but the crowds are also smaller,” DPS spokeswoman Diane Brown said.

Eight other citations were given during “High Noon,” including four tickets for sales and solicitation of merchandise such as necklaces and shirts and two tickets for possession of alcohol on the Diag.

Brown said the majority of tickets given in past years have been to nonstudents. “In the last six events, including (Saturday), DPS has arrested or cited 212 persons, four of whom were U-M students,” Brown said.

A DPS arrest for possession of marijuana can generally lead to a fine of up to $2,000 and one year in prison, while use of marijuana is a $100 fine and up to 90 days in prison. But these penalties can vary depending on the amount in possession, and repeat offenses.

The AAPD fine for use of marijuana on city property is $25.

DPS enforces state law infractions, while AAPD enforces a city ordinance that differs from state law, which results in the differing penalties.

Brook suggested that DPS should take a more lenient approach to marijuana smoking, citing as an example the AAPD’s tolerance of open use at the Monroe Street block party.

“There was nobody arrested there,” he said. “On city property there were people smoking copious amounts of marijuana.

“They don’t have to arrest people for smoking marijuana at the Hash Bash — they choose to arrest people,” Brook said. “(Saturday), marijuana was not something that was a big shocker in Ann Arbor. … People kind of expected it, it wasn’t a big deal. Nor is it a big deal any other day of the week.”

Although the majority of attendees were not from the Ann Arbor area, many students were present. The University chapter of NORML was the student sponsor of the event.

Other students, such as College Libertarians Vice Chair Andrew Moylan, worked at a table on the Diag during the rally and attempted to gather signatures in support of the Ann Arbor medical marijuana initiative.

If enough signatures are received, the issue could appear on the ballot in the November city elections. Moylan, an LSA junior, said College Libertarians collected “a couple of pages” of signatures at Saturday’s event.

“We’ve been relatively successful,” Moylan said. “I really don’t think it’s out of the question to have it on the ballot.”

He added that one difficulty in gathering signatures is confirming that voters are registered in Ann Arbor. “Since they’re not registered in the city they can’t sign,” he said. “Most students who come aren’t registered voters.”

Hillsdale resident Trena Moss, dressed as a bong, was among the demonstrators on the Diag.

“I don’t know why our politicians don’t have compassion for the sick people who need marijuana,” Moss said. “If they pass the medical marijuana here in Ann Arbor, I’m considering moving.”

Not all students who attended were interested in the issues at hand or the speakers. LSA junior Amanda Glasgow and Western Michigan University student Rick Rivers stood on the outskirts of the rally.

“We just saw it, and wanted to laugh at the people mostly,” Glasgow said. “There seems to be an age gap — there are young kids and older people. I don’t get what they’re saying about liberating themselves — they’re all white middle-class people.”

Note: Hash Bash '04 turnout not as high as expected.

Source: Michigan Daily (MI Edu)
Author: Ashley Dinges & Donn M. Fresard, Daily Staff Reporters
Published: April 05, 2004
Copyright: 2004 The Michigan Daily
Contact: daily.letters@umich.edu
Website: http://www.michigandaily.com/

Related Articles & Web Sites:

NORML
http://www.norml.org/

Hash Bash
http://www.hashbash.com/

The Faded But Still Not Forgotten
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread18584.shtml

Hash Bashers Know Where The Line Is
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread18583.shtml

Activists Have High Hopes for Hash Bash
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread18575.shtml

Whims of Weather Affect Success of Hash Bash
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread18526.shtml


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Comment #5 posted by ekim on April 05, 2004 at 12:24:57 PT
Have Leap speaker at your event
Those in MI Molly Ivans will speak in Grand Rapids Fountain St church on 4-20 at 7 pm.

http://www.leap.cc/events/events.php Apr 6 04 "Cops Say Legalize Drugs" 08:00 PM Peter Moskos New York New York USA Former law enforcement officer and LEAP Speaker Peter Moskos calls for an end to America's longest war.

Apr 6 04 Effect of Drug Prohibition on the Urban Community: Two Perspectives 08:00 PM Peter Moskos New York New York USA Speaker Peter Moskos is joined by Joyce Rivera, founder and director of St. Ann's Corner for Harm Reduction, NY City's oldest needle exchange program to provide two perspectives about the harm caused by drug prohibition: the criminal justice side and the public health side.

Apr 6 04 "Cops Say Legalize Drugs" 08:00 PM Peter Moskos New York New York USA Former law enforcement officer and LEAP Speaker Peter Moskos calls for an end to America's longest war.

Apr 6 04 Effect of Drug Prohibition on the Urban Community: Two Perspectives 08:00 PM Peter Moskos New York New York USA Speaker Peter Moskos is joined by Joyce Rivera, founder and director of St. Ann's Corner for Harm Reduction, NY City's oldest needle exchange program to provide two perspectives about the harm caused by drug prohibition: the criminal justice side and the public health side.

Apr 6 04 "Cops Say Legalize Drugs" 08:00 PM Peter Moskos New York New York USA Former law enforcement officer and LEAP Speaker Peter Moskos calls for an end to America's longest war.

Apr 6 04 Effect of Drug Prohibition on the Urban Community: Two Perspectives 08:00 PM Peter Moskos New York New York USA Speaker Peter Moskos is joined by Joyce Rivera, founder and director of St. Ann's Corner for Harm Reduction, NY City's oldest needle exchange program to provide two perspectives about the harm caused by drug prohibition: the criminal justice side and the public health side.

Apr 7 04 Civil Liberties Monitoring Project 07:00 PM Bob Owens Redway California USA The Civil Liberties Monitoring Project of Garberville will host a radio call-in interview with Advisory Board Member Bob Owens on community station 91.1. May be simulcast on both 88.3 and 88.9 FM.

Apr 8 04 Southern Illinois University-Carbondale 09:00 AM Howard Wooldridge Carbondale Illinois USA Board Member Howard Wooldridge will be the key note speaker at an all day symposium sponsored by the Graduate Social Work Student Organization, the Social Work Student Alliance and the School of Social Work.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #4 posted by E_Johnson on April 05, 2004 at 11:34:46 PT
People don't see our own war against racism
There is a perception on the left that the marijuana legalization movement is a bunch of spoiled white kids who only want their own rights.

Which is pretty much wrong.

There is no bigger engine of racist oppression in America than the WOD.

How many black and Hispanic Americans have been deprived of the right to vote thanks to the WOD? Deprived of a lot of things. Employment, children, food stamps, college, freedom, self determination.

But these are the times we're living in.

This is what has become of the civil rights movement of the sixties, when everyone was passing reefer and listening to Marvin Gaye.

Now we have white kids carping and laughing because other white kids and white people who were part of the original sixties marijuanal-laced rejection of racist ideology in this country come together to try to stop white America's latest experiment with ways to keep the brown down.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #3 posted by E_Johnson on April 05, 2004 at 08:52:34 PT
That story really stresses me
I'm trying to let people know about this rape incident so that they stop believing in the two central myths of marijuana prohibition today, which is:

Nobody really goes to jail for pot any more.

and

A little jail never hurt anyone.

But every time I think about it, it stresses me a LOT.

Maybe it will stress other people too. It shows them the truth. Yes Amanda Glasgow, even white middle class people need liberation. IT's not funny at all, unless you think being raped in jail over pot is funny.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #2 posted by goneposthole on April 05, 2004 at 08:42:16 PT
low turn out
1500 is a far cry from 50,000.

Think the economy had something to do with it? The high price of gasoline?

Kind of an 'Agony and Ecstasy' problem.

I suppose the Pope was none too pleased to see the wine stock slowly be consumed by Michelangelo when he could be up there at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel painting away. But, no, he decided to take a break and get drunk.

The Hash Basher's took a break.

This might help explain the current dilemma:

http://www.halfpasthuman.com/HPHFH_COLLAPSE.htm



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #1 posted by E_Johnson on April 05, 2004 at 08:32:42 PT
I wrote about them about Amanda Glasgow
I sent them this link about the rape and told them to show it to Amanda Glasgow of LSA.

http://www.spr.org/en/news/2003/0614.html



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